Wednesday, 27 April 2016

Midweek Musing. Whither have we wandered?

It's 3 am, so naturally I am awake. Well, OK, that was a little sarcastic. It is 3 am.

Instead of going back to sleep, my mind started wandering. For some reason, it wandered to ethical food. I was thinking about what I have to do today, get up in a few hours and go shopping for food for this evening's event, I was thinking corn chips with a dip, but so many corn chips are made with palm oil unethically produced ...



What state has humanity got to that we need to qualify when a product is ethically produced? Fair trade chocolate that is made without the labour of slaves - yes, slaves, in the 21st century. Fair trade clothes made without labour in unsafe conditions for unfair wages. Palm oil produced without decimating the land and its inhabitants. Make up or shampoo produced without testing that harms animals.

That we have to state on our chocolate and coffee and clothes that humans were treated with dignity in the making of these products is, to me, utterly ridiculous. Surely, that ought to go without saying?

That we have to state on the labels of food and fashion that the earth and other creatures were respected, unharmed, in the making of these products is shameful. We have care of the earth and all who live here, and we have so normalised careless behaviour that we need to qualify those occasions when we have acted as we ought.


I haven't any answers. But at 3 am as I ponder my options for food purchases later this morning, I find myself incensed at humanity. At 3 am on the day of a performance of (in)humanity stories, I realise again the need for such stories that call us back, again and again, to the best of our humanity, from which we far too often wander.


1 comment:

Heather said...

How utterly ridiculous that, as you say, we point out those things produced with ethical behaviour, when surely this should be the default position.
It is a sign of hope when we do not allow greed or apathy or laziness to dictate our choices. When choose to use our freedom to create demand for ethically-produced things, perhaps then we recognise our ultimate interdependence.